Take a trip out Morvern way and lose yourself in the Gardens of Ardtornish, walk along the shores of Loch Aline to a medieval castle and look out for otters on the low road to Lochaline. Explore the cleared village of Inniemore and enjoy a nature safari on The Scottish Wildife Trust reserve at Rahoy. Make time for lunch or dinner at The Whitehouse Restaurant in Lochaline and maybe take the ferry on a day trip to The Isle of Mull. Head out Drimnin way to make a wish at Clach na Criche on the way to Nc'ean Distillery.

Lochaline is the vibrant hub of The Morvern Peninsula with a shop, hotel, restaurant, two cafes and ferry terminal with regular sailings to Fishnish on The Isle of Mull. Home to The Morvern Gala week in mid July; this is a great place to engage with the local community.

Be sure to stop off at The Scottish Wildlife Trust Reserve at Rahoy on the road to Lochaline and take a walk along the shores of Loch Arienas and into the woods beyond. Step back in time and listen to history of the cleared village of Aoineadh Mor as you wander around this Forestry Commission walk. Take a stroll through the gardens of Ardtonish House and head out for a walk along the shores of Loch Aline to Fossil Burn and Ardtonish Castle beyond.

Take the slow road to Drimnin and visit Nc'ean Distillery on The Drimnin Estate, just one of a trio of distilleries to visit during your stay in Ardnamurchan and Mull. Stop off at Clach na Criche on your way back, fill your mouth with water from a local spring, pass three times around the stone and make a wish. We hope that your wish will come true and that you will return some day to this stunning area on the West coast of Scotland...

 

1

 ( Morvern )

Reasons To Visit: Geological Feature

Take a wish when you are Morvern Bound at Clach na Criche. This Wishing Stone is steeped in local folklore and in ancient times if you filled your mouth with water from the local spring and passed through the stone three times without touching the sides or swallowing the water your wishes would surely come true.

This interesting feature is formed from a dyke that intruded into surrounding rocks some 60 million years ago. The surrounding rock has long been eroded to reveal the dyke as prominent outcrop with its large angular 'wishing hole' in its centre.

Park at the Forestry Commission Car Park. The Wishing Stone is a short walk west from the car park.


Reasons To Visit: Wildlife Hotspot

Take time to stop off at Achnaha Community Woodland on the wee wee road from Lochaline to Drimnin. This lovely community managed woodland is a delight to wander through at any time of year. There is a lovely circular walk though the woodlands and onto the coast and plenty of places to sit and enjoy a picnic.

The deciduous woodland is particularly stunning in spring with a carpet of bluebells and a soundscape of woodland birds and cuckoos...


3

 ( Morvern )

Reasons To Visit: Walk, Historical

Aoineadh Mor (pronounced Inniemore) is a deserted village and serves as a testimony to the Highland Clearances.  The story of the clearances in 1824 is told through the words of Mary Cameron in a number of interactive interpretation  panels scattered throughout the village.  The site is run by Forrestry Commission Scotland and there is a well signed walk starting from the car park.

Take time to explore the village, listen to Mary's story and reflect on what could have been.


Reasons To Visit: Historical

The Carved Stones of Kiel are a collection of medieval carved gravestone slabs originally located in the graveyard of Kiel. These impressive stones, decorated with Celtic artwork, are now housed in the Old Session House, by Kiel Church. Kiel was an important religious centre in the Middle Ages.

The gravestones, mainly of schist and slate, date from the 14th- 16th century, and are engraved with the intricate Celtic artwork bearing witness to the importance of the persons whose graves they adorned (e.g. chiefs and church dignitaries).  Two stones date from the eighth century and are believed to represent boundary crosses.

Each slab has an information plaque of varying length, giving information of the possible date of carving, a detailed description of the carving and its significance where known, former location and other useful information on the stone type etc. 


5

 ( Morvern )

Reasons To Visit: Village, Public Toilet facilities

Lochaline is a small coastal village at the mouth of Loch Aline on the Sound of Mull.

Facilities in the village include a grocery shop, hotel, social club, two cafes and public conveniences. The award-wining White House Restaurant offers local, seasonal and sustainably harvested produce that showcases the best of Highland cuisine, with a lunch and evening service. This is a dining experience not to be missed (booking required)! Lochaline also has a Sand Mine and Harbour and Pontoon Facilities; the latter with visitor pontoon, swinging moorings and shore facilities.

Take time to visit the 19th century Kiel Church and burial ground. Keil was an important religious centre in the Middle Ages and the Old Session House by the Church displays seventeen medieval carved gravestone slabs.

Lochaline serves as a ferry port to the Isle of Mull with regular crossings throughout the year. There are some lovely walks in the areas, including two scenic coastal walks along the shores of Loch Ailort (the Kinlochaline Low Road and Ardtornish Castle Walk). Nearby, the lovely hill garden at Ardtornish Estate are a delight to visit, being particularly spectacular in Spring and Autumn. The harbour and coastline around Lochaline are good places to look for otters.


Reasons To Visit: Walk, Nature Reserve, Wildlife Hotspot

The Rahoy Hills Wildlife Reserve has been managed by The Scottish Wildlife Trust in association with The Ardtornish Estate since the 1970s. There is a well signed, if slightly boggy, walk around the shores of Loch Arienas to the old deserted settlement of Arienas, with great views over the loch as well as a walk up through the woods and along the banks of The Black water river.

There is a small parking area off the A884 just north of the turning to Rahoy and a couple of interpretation signs.  There are occasional conservation work days over the summer and this is a great opportunity to get involved in the local community if one is scheduled during your visit.


7

 ( Morvern )

Reasons To Visit: Gardens

Ardtornish  Gardens stretches over 25 acres and is a mixture of formal and informal plantings that bear testament to a family tradition in gardening and an ‘enthusiasm for the exotic’ of a bygone era.

This is a lovely garden for strolling around and taking in the tranquillity and beauty of gardens within a garden, in a stunning location dominated by loch and hills.   The history of planting, composition and design trace an intimacy, enthusiasm and passion for plants (both native and exotic) of its past and present owners.

The garden is open seasonally and there is a small admission charge payable at the Estate Office.